Artificial Intelligence and Biomedical Engineering

Prof. Dr. Yvo Marcelo Chiaradia Masselli

The course aims at presenting the most commonly used techniques of Artificial Intelligence as well as its applications in Biomedical Engineering, such as bioelectric signal processing, pattern recognition and automatic development of diagnostic. Neural Networks and Fuzzy Logic will be treated as the main topics throughout the course. By the end, the student will be able to project and implement, in specific softwares, solutions for typical problems on the field.

Basics of Signal Processing Using Matlab

Prof. Gerardo Marx Chávez-Campos

The focus of the lecture is to introduce students to the basics of signal processing in biomedical applications, by understanding the process of signal acquisition and preconditioning in hardware, as well as digital post-processing using Matlab. The student will be introduced to the concept of one of the most powerful tools in digital signal processing, digital Fourier transform. Thus, the concepts of Fourier series and Fourier transform will be skimmed. Afterwards several practical applications will be presented for a better understanding.

Themes of the lecture:

  • Introduction to the Fourier’s series and transform
  • Basics of digital signal processing
  • Practical example: Signal analysis in Phonocardiogram (PCG)
    • Understanding the heart’s physiology
    • Designing hardware for signal acquisition
    • Signal processing using Matlab

 

Medical Image Processing

Gábor Kertész

Topics of the course are image processing fundamentals and object recognition: 

  • Image representation
  • Spatial filtering
  • Greyscale and colour images
  • Morphological image processing
  • Image segmentation
  • Colour object recognition

The course has theoretical as well as practical parts.

Cognitive Ergonomics / User Centred Design

Richard Vos, M.Sc.

During this course we will go into the user’s side of development, we will explore who and what the engineers are working for. 

Now, we realize that anything can be made by now, and if not technologically doable today, it will be tomorrow. This makes that the ‘consumer’ industry in refocusing from technology driven design towards user-centred design. Yes, sustainability is also a buzzword these days, but think about it, does sustainable only mean degradable or reusable? No, of course not! If things need to be sustainable it means also that these products are used well and to the satisfaction of the customer / user.

The two days programme course Cognitive Ergonomics / User Centred Design (UCD) will focus on product development from an interaction design perspective in which insights from psychology and the domain of user interfaces will be applied. You will work in a project team towards a solution to a real world problem. A theoretic framework will be offered and several user-centred methods and techniques from the field of interaction design will be applied. In the end each team will present their solution.

The course will contain these topics: 

  • Beyond usability; what the user really wants, but has not even thought of yet – lecture and workshops in which you will be introduced to the field of Human Technology interaction. You will have to try thinking the thoughts of your targeted user, understand the context of use, the human-product interaction, requirement specification, and more.
     
  • Lectures will focus on cognitive ergonomics, user interfaces, principles of design, and, yes… bloopers. 

In addition, the second day we will start with cultural background presentations (for this part each nationality has to prepare a really smashing presentation). Afterwards we’ll be discussing intercultural differences and how we - and international product development - relate to these differences. 

Biomedical Applications of Transducers, Microcontrollers and Related Electronics

Assoc. Prof. Dr. I. Cengiz Koçum, Mehmet Yüksekkaya, Ph.D.

Sensors and transducers are the eyes and ears of modern measurement instrumentation and control systems. Many types of machines and also medical instruments depend on transducers and sensors to provide input data about the environment. Widely used in both analog and digital instrumentation systems, sensors provide the interface between electronic circuits and “real world” where things happen.

Nevertheless, all the data have to be processed. The most common technology consists in the use of microcontrollers. So this course also discusses the programming model and basic features of microcontrollers and their application to biomedical instrumentation.

The goal of this course is to provide a representative overview of sensors, how they work, how they are applied and what basic electronic circuits are needed to support them. Further lectures and laboratory experiments cover the basic principles of hardware and software design for a microcontroller based system and interfacing biomedical sensors to microcontrollers are emphasized.

Course Outline:
Sensor and transducer principles. Common transducers for biomedical applications. Overview of PIC microcontroller, Basic MikroC programming for PIC microcontroller. Interface and related electronics of sensors and I/O devices for microcontrollers. Design of microcontroller systems for medical use such as design of a heart beat monitor and a digital thermometer.

Date Course Syllabus
11.09.Transducer, sensor and related circuits with some applications.
12.09.Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded Design. PIC microcontrollers and MikroC programming language. Designing simple microcontroller applications.
13.09.Amplifier basics. Transducer to microcontroller interface and related electronics. Analog to Digital conversion using microcontroller.
14.09. A conductivity meter and digital thermometer will be built using microcontroller.

Biomaterial Science: 
Fundamentals & Nanotechnological Applications

Ass.Prof. Dilek Çökeliler

During the last century, interest in biomaterials has grown from mere curiosity to routine clinical use, saving lives and improving the quality of life for millions of people. Today, biomaterials and medical devices are a $100 billion industry. This course will cover many fundamental areas such as: 

  • An overview of the biomaterials field (definitions, etc.),
  • The current status of the biomaterials field, 
  • The properties of biomaterials that make them useful in medical (and clinical) applications, 
  • Introduction to the major classes of biomedical materials: ceramics, metals, and polymers. Their structure, properties, and fabrication connected to biological applications, from implants to tissue engineered devices. 
  • New trends and future prospects. 

Course Outline:
Material science and relation between medicine. Properties of polymeric, metallic and ceramic biomaterials. Natural biological materials. Artificial biologic materials. Applications of material sciences in biomedical engineering. Mechanics, corrosive and surface properties, tissue reactions of biomaterials. Medical applications of researches in material sciences. Synthesis of nanomaterials, nanoparticles and biomedical applications. Nanostructured coatings. 

DateCourse Syllabus
11.9.   Introduction to the Material Science & Engineering Biomaterial Science
Bulk properties - chemical bonds - surface energy 
Classifications & advanced biomaterials
12.9.Polymeric, metallic & ceramic biomaterials
13.9.Composite biomaterials performance of biomaterials; Mechanical and biological tests
14.9.Introduction to the nanotechnology 
Fundamentals of synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials 
Nanostructured coatings; Plasma polymerisation technique nanosensors; NEMS and MEMS 
Carbon nanotubes

Safety in Biomedical Technology

PROF. DR. THOMAS LEKSCHA

In this two day course we will have the focus on the safety in biomedical technology.

The course topics are:

  • Safety?
  • Safety in biomedical technology
  • Active medical products
  • Medical Devices Operator Ordinance
  • Current/voltage influence on patient and/or staff
  • Tools or utilities to ensure safety
  • Leakage currents.

The course is planned in advance as lectures and practical examples in medical technology laboratory of the university.

Biomaterial Science: 
Fundamentals & Nanotechnological Applications

Ass.Prof. Dilek Çökeliler

During the last century, interest in biomaterials has grown from mere curiosity to routine clinical use, saving lives and improving the quality of life for millions of people. Today, biomaterials and medical devices are a $100 billion industry. This course will cover many fundamental areas such as: 

  • An overview of the biomaterials field (definitions, etc.),
  • The current status of the biomaterials field, 
  • The properties of biomaterials that make them useful in medical (and clinical) applications, 
  • Introduction to the major classes of biomedical materials: ceramics, metals, and polymers. Their structure, properties, and fabrication connected to biological applications, from implants to tissue engineered devices. 
  • New trends and future prospects. 

Course Outline:
Material science and relation between medicine. Properties of polymeric, metallic and ceramic biomaterials. Natural biological materials. Artificial biologic materials. Applications of material sciences in biomedical engineering. Mechanics, corrosive and surface properties, tissue reactions of biomaterials. Medical applications of researches in material sciences. Synthesis of nanomaterials, nanoparticles and biomedical applications. Nanostructured coatings. 

DATECOURSE SYLLABUS
29.8.   Introduction to the Material Science & Engineering Biomaterial Science
Bulk properties - chemical bonds - surface energy 
Classifications & advanced biomaterials
30.8.Polymeric, metallic & ceramic biomaterials
31.8.Composite biomaterials performance of biomaterials; Mechanical and biological tests
1.9.Introduction to the nanotechnology 
Fundamentals of synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials 
Nanostructured coatings; Plasma polymerisation technique nanosensors; NEMS and MEMS 
Carbon nanotubes

Biomedical Applications of Transducers, Microcontrollers and Related Electronics

Assoc. Prof. Dr. I. Cengiz Koçum, Mehmet Yüksekkaya, M.Sc.

Sensors and transducers are the eyes and ears of modern measurement instrumentation and control systems. Many types of machines and also medical instruments depend on transducers and sensors to provide input data about the environment. Widely used in both analog and digital instrumentation systems, sensors provide the interface between electronic circuits and “real world” where things happen.

Nevertheless, all the data have to be processed. The most common technology consists in the use of microcontrollers. So this course also discusses the programming model and basic features of microcontrollers and their application to biomedical instrumentation.

The goal of this course is to provide a representative overview of sensors, how they work, how they are applied and what basic electronic circuits are needed to support them. Further lectures and laboratory experiments cover the basic principles of hardware and software design for a microcontroller based system and interfacing biomedical sensors to microcontrollers are emphasized.

Course Outline:
Sensor and transducer principles. Common transducers for biomedical applications. Overview of PIC microcontroller, Basic MikroC programming for PIC microcontroller. Interface and related electronics of sensors and I/O devices for microcontrollers. Design of microcontroller systems for medical use such as design of a heart beat monitor and a digital thermometer.

Date COURSE SYLLABUS
23.08.  Transducer, sensor and related circuits with some applications.
24.08.Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded Design. PIC microcontrollers and MikroC programming language. Designing simple microcontroller applications.
25.08.Amplifier basics. Transducer to microcontroller interface and related electronics. Analog to Digital conversion using microcontroller.
26.08. A conductivity meter and digital thermometer will be built using microcontroller.

Biomedical Applications of Transducers, Microcontrollers and Related Electronics

Assoc. Prof. Dr. I. Cengiz Koçum, Mehmet Yüksekkaya, M.Sc.

Sensors and transducers are the eyes and ears of modern measurement instrumentation and control systems. Many types of machines and also medical instruments depend on transducers and sensors to provide input data about the environment. Widely used in both analog and digital instrumentation systems, sensors provide the interface between electronic circuits and “real world” where things happen.

Nevertheless, all the data have to be processed. The most common technology consists in the use of microcontrollers. So this course also discusses the programming model and basic features of microcontrollers and their application to biomedical instrumentation.

The goal of this course is to provide a representative overview of sensors, how they work, how they are applied and what basic electronic circuits are needed to support them. Further lectures and laboratory experiments cover the basic principles of hardware and software design for a microcontroller based system and interfacing biomedical sensors to microcontrollers are emphasized.

Course Outline:
Sensor and transducer principles. Common transducers for biomedical applications. Overview of PIC microcontroller, Basic MikroC programming for PIC microcontroller. Interface and related electronics of sensors and I/O devices for microcontrollers. Design of microcontroller systems for medical use such as design of a heart beat monitor and a digital thermometer.

Date COURSE SYLLABUS
25.08.    Transducer, sensor and related circuits with some applications.
26.08.Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded Design. PIC microcontrollers and MikroC programming language. Designing simple microcontroller applications.
27.08.Amplifier basics. Transducer to microcontroller interface and related electronics. Analog to Digital conversion using microcontroller.
28.08. A conductivity meter and digital thermometer will be built using microcontroller.

Biomechanical Modelling of Implanted Bone Systems

Dr. Lucian Rusu, Dr. Dan Ioan Stoia

Knowledge on Modelling of Biomechanical Behaviour of Implanted Bone Systems contributes to the develop­ment of new implants/prostheses having a better long-time functionality, development of corresponding surgi­cal instruments, injury prevention, and not at least to manage with ageing.            

The course topics consist in:

  • Basic anatomical knowledge - bones, joints, muscles and possible motions in human joints;
  • Implants, prostheses, and ortheses – implant design, biomaterials, customized implant manufacturing.
  • Kinematic modelling of biomechanical systems – motion study, Denavit-Hartenberg convention.
  • Static modelling of biomechanical systems
  • Numerical analysis - basics of FEM theory and general ANSYS specific capabilities.

The course consists of theoretical sessions followed by computer simulations.

Modelling of Biomechanical Behaviour of Implanted Bone Systems

Dr. Lucian Rusu, Dr. Dan Ioan STOIA

Knowledge on Modelling of Biomechanical Behaviour of Implanted Bone Systems contributes to the develop­ment of new implants/prostheses having a better long-time functionality, development of corresponding surgi­cal instruments, injury prevention, and not at least to manage with ageing.            

The course topics consist in:

  • Basic anatomical knowledge - bones, joints, muscles and possible motions in human joints;
  • Kinematic modelling of biomechanical systems – motion study, Denavit-Hartenberg convention. Based on this convention, human upper and lower limbs are modelled.
  • Static modelling of biomechanical systems - equilibrium of biomechanical systems (bones, muscles, liga­ments and connecting joints). Based on the principles of mechanics, human limbs equilibrium is studied.
  • Dynamic modelling - motion study of anatomical segments under the action of a force system. The fundamental characteristics and general theorems are presented and applied in order to study the human locomotion, improve the balance and prevent falls and fractures.
  • Numerical analysis - basics of FEM theory and general ANSYS specific capabilities. Using Finite Element Analysis biomechanical behaviour of human body parts can be predicted.
  • Implants, prostheses, and ortheses – implant design, biomaterials, customized implant manufacturing. Several implants for long bones are presented. Stages of customized implant manufacturing, starting from image acquisition based on CT scanning to implant finishing and coating are presented and exemplified for a total hip/knee prosthesis.
  • Applications - numerical analysis of an osteoporotic femur implanted with a customized hip/knee prosthesis.

The course consists of theoretical sessions followed by computer simulations focused on prediction of the biomechanical behaviour of customized implanted bone systems in case of elderly people.

Microfluidic Devices - Fundamentals

Prof. Dr. Michael Schlüter, Prof. Dr. Heidi Lenz-Strauch

The application of microtechnology to chemistry and biology – summarized in the name "lab-on-a-chip" – is a rapidly increasing field of activity with many applications in biomedical engineering. In this course the following topics are covered: 

  • Microfluidics
  • Polymer micromachining 
  • Glass micromachining
  • Characterization of microstructures.

In the practical part of the course the students design simple microfluidic structures, build them by different manufacturing methods, characterize the structures and test them. 

Microcontroller Applications for Home Monitoring

Mehmet YÜksekkaya

Home monitoring of health status allows elderly to live longer in their own home and more independently while reducing the cost for inpatient care. At this point research on intelligent electronic medical devices for healthy ageing is encouraged. Even for simple electronic medical devices mostly microcontroller based design is used. This course discusses the programming model and basic features of a microcontroller and the application of microcontrollers to biomedical instrumentation. Lectures and laboratory experiments cover the basic principles of hardware and software design for a microcontroller based system and interfacing biomedical sensors to microcontrollers are emphasized.

Course Outline:
Overview of PIC microcontroller, Basic MikroC programming for PIC microcontroller, Interface of sensors and I/O devices to microcontroller chips, Design of microcontroller systems for medical use such as design of a heart beat monitor and/or a digital thermometer.

When a design is realised and a complete product is available, testing of the requirements is important. A few examples of testing are shown and how they can be used in daily practise of the designer.

DATECOURSE SYLLABUS
2.9.Introduction to microcontrollers and embedded design
3.9.PIC microcontrollers and MikroC programming language
4.9.Programming PIC microcontrollers and designing simple microcontroller applications     
5.9.Analog to digital conversion using microcontrollers and applications

Developing Smartphone Apps

Miklós Mezei

Android powers hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries around the world. It's the largest installed base of any mobile platform and growing fast — every day another million users power up their Android devices for the first time and start looking for apps, games, and other digital content. That is why how important to get to knowledge about Android (Java) programming.

In this course we will learn about the:

  • Mobile platforms
  • Base of the Android OS
  • Android Integrated development environments
  • Android programming language
  • The Android program structure
  • Google play services
  • Building your own application

Microfluidic Devices - Simulation and Experiments

Ass.Prof. Dr. Rui de Lima, Ass.Prof. Dr. Antonio Luque, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Stefan Gaßmann

This course is subdivided into three parts: calculations, simulations and biomedical applications.

In the first part the basics about fluid calculation including the Navier-Stokes-Equation are presented. The meaning of the equation and the application to the microfluidics is described. In the lab part a CFD tool is used to simulate simple structures.

In the second part another approach to calculate and simulate the behavior of microfluidics is covered: the analogy between fluidics and electronics. Every fluidic part has its counterpart in the electronics, so the well-known network analysis tools for electronics can be used for microfluidics too.  In the class the analogy is explained and in a lab part simple microfluidic structures are simulated using this approach.

The third part of this course week covers the biomedical applications. The basics of biomicrofluidics up to the applications are described. Experimental techniques to measure blood flow at micro scale level, such as conventional and confocal micro-PIV are shown. Additionally, the importance of computational fluid dynamics can be demonstrated and proved as a crucial way to obtain more detailed information about blood flow. A special topic of this part is the investigation of blood flow in microchannels. The behavior and clinical applications are described and demonstrated.

Ethics and Design

ir. Marten Wiersma, M.Ed.

In this course the method of designing as a process is educated. In this process important steps are done before the hard design starts.

In general the design process is: think and find the best solution for a need. The thinking can be done in different ways. This difference is related to the complexity of the design process. The engineer is in between two groups: 

  1. the prudence makers / managers and 
  2. the consumers. 

The first group supposes that the responsibility of engineers is restricted to the technical choices they make. They believe that the consequences are not the responsibility of the engineers. The consumers expect from the engineer protection against failures and protection against harmful consequences of a design. In this sepa­rated field, the ethics show a way of handling this tension: the ethical aspects of design. What are the respon­sibilities of an engineer? We will see how the designer has to handle this conflict of interests. Tools for a sound reaction are educated, so that the designing engineer can take responsibility for his design. Designing medical devices and aids for healthy aging is directly linked to ethical decisions.

This makes clear that the design process depends on the designing person. A person in general has his own background, based on culture and personality. We will look at the differences between cultures and we will find out what the basic behaviour is of each person. It is important to recognise the differences between people and their solutions for a given problem.

For a good design you need to find the requirements of the user. Normally the user is not a technician. His requirements are given in a non-technical language, so it should be “translated” into technical requirements. The QFD is used as a tool to do this translation.

The design process starts with marketing and generating ideas and will go through 5 steps to realise the final product. We will introduce you to the methods of generating new ideas and of checking different solutions by means of statistical comparison.

After a design has been chosen, you have to check the design for its safety aspects. In this course we will introduce you to a method of checking the safety of the design by means of a “Failure Mode and Effect Analysis” (FMEA).

Of course it is important to have the best solution for a product. Therefore it is possible to check the functions in relation to the costs of that function. We will introduce you to the system of Value Analysis / Value engineering (VA/VE).

A good product can be produced and maintained when necessary. This requires special activities during the design process. We will show different solutions for different problems that occur during design (Design for Maintenance: DfM and other related tools in the DfXX category).

When a design is realised and a complete product is available, testing of the requirements is important. A few examples of testing are shown and how they can be used in daily practise of the designer.

Product Development of Lifetime Biomedical Applications

Dipl.-Ing. Pekka Salonen

Goal of the course is to introduce students to the product development of biomechanical applications of dif­ferent aged people by showing participants several real-life product case-studies and letting the students per­form product development tasks in teams. In addition the learning of various number of development tools, software and benchmarking by utilizing internet is in focus. 

Themes of the course: 

  • Introduction to product development process / methodology
  • Introduction to efficient product development tools
  • Case studies of biomechanical applications for different ages of population
    • Prostheses and orthoses 
    • Technical aids for disabled persons 
    • Trauma implants 
    • Spinal implants 
  • Product and design requirements for biomechanical applications taking into consideration the patient’s age
  • Learning by doing -> product development work in teams.

Teacher of the course is professional in product development and development of biomechanical applications. 

Sensor Systems for Biomedical Devices

Ass.Prof. Dr. İ. Cengiz Koçum

Most medical instruments are electronic devices requiring electrical input signals. For signal acquisition of biopotentials different kinds of electrodes are used. In other cases a sensor or transducer is used to convert nonelectrical physical parameters or stimuli, such as force, pressure, temperature, etc. to an analogous electrical signal proportional to the value of the original stimulus parameter. As a summary, sensors provide the interface between electronic circuits and measurement objects.

The terms: Home monitoring and e-medicine (health information for consumers on first aid for medical emergencies, accidents and injuries, symptoms and treatment of diseases and health conditions) which are important for healthy ageing have begun to cover research and technology fields all over the world, and sensors are the heart of such devices as well.

The aim of this course is to provide a representative overview of sensors, how they work, how they are applied and what basic electronic circuits are needed to support them.   
 
Course Outline: 

Sensor technologies, Basic transducer principles, Thermo resistive and thermoelectric transducers, Electrets and capacitive transducers, Piezoelectric, pyroelectric and piezoresistive effects, Hall effect and magnetic transducers, Radiation based transducers, Electrochemical transducers, related electronics and biomedical applications.

Electrical Circuits for Photoplethysmography

Dipl.-Ing. Friedrich Mayr

Photoplethysmography is an optical and non invasive method for measuring volume changes, in our case the volume changes of the finger arteries during the pulse wave. The shape of the pulse wave reflects the conditions for the peripheral blood circulation, which is of diagnostic importance for hypertension. Especially elderly people frequently suffer from multiple diseases and are treated with several drugs simultaneously and the cause of the hypertension is not always clear but will have a great influence on the correct treatment. 

The electronic instrumentation for this sensor includes a current source for an LED and a photoamplifier for the light detector, as well as some signal conditioning to prepare the signal for proper A/D conversion. This kind of analogue circuit design is a widely underestimated challenge in the construction of medical devices. 

In this course we will design several circuits step by step, in the morning sessions we will learn how this sensor as well as the required electronic circuits work and we will discuss different ways to obtain a proper signal for digitalization. In the afternoon sessions we will put our conclusions to a practical test by simulating and prototyping the respective electronic circuits.

Electronic Basics of Hypertension Diagnosis

Drs. Jan Zijlstra

Assignment: A non-invasive accurate auscultatory blood pressure monitor will be built during this course and signal analysis is done on the computer. 

This one-week course consists of lectures and workshops.

Hypertension (serious elevated blood pressure) is the most serious attributing risk factor in the developed world (about 50% of the elderly people). The risk of developing hypertension is increasing with ageing. Early diag­nosis and treatment is essential in minimizing the effects.

Currently a lot of low-cost ‘household’ devices are available on the market, however a significant number of them with disputable accuracy. This may lead either to an undetected (or at least later) hypertension with higher mortality – in case the reading is too low, or to an unnecessary visit to the physician in case of a too high reading. The latter case is putting an additional to health care costs, due to the high number of hypertension cases. So more accurate devices result in a lower mortality and lower public health care costs.

In this course, the physiological background of the cardiovascular system and physical control processes of blood pressure are provided. Next the basics of non-invasive blood pressure measurement are presented. Basics of electronics and use of measurement devices during the workshops is given as well. Signals (pressure and Korotkoff) tend to be weak and disturbed by noise, so they have to be filtered and amplified. How this can be done by using operational amplifiers and filtering techniques will be part of the course.

Existing software will be used to analyse and interpret the recorded signals. The course consists of theoretical sessions in the morning and practical (group) workshops in the afternoon. Theory and practice are seamlessly coming together in this course. The test is to show an operating blood pressure monitor, using an improved standardized auscultatory method with correct signal analysis, which can be tested on the students themselves. In a final assessment the students report on their findings and demonstrate the acquired medical and technical competencies.

Modelling of Biomechanical Behaviour of Implanted Bone Systems

Prof. Dr. Mirela Toth-Tascau, Dr. Lucian Rusu

Knowledge on Modelling of Biomechanical Behaviour of Implanted Bone Systems contributes to the develop­ment of new implants/prostheses having a better long-time functionality, development of corresponding surgi­cal instruments, injury prevention, and not at least to manage with ageing.            

The course topics consist in:

  • Basic anatomical knowledge - bones, joints, muscles and possible motions in human joints;

  • Kinematic modelling of biomechanical systems – motion study, Denavit-Hartenberg convention. Based on this convention, human upper and lower limbs are modelled.

  • Static modelling of biomechanical systems - equilibrium of biomechanical systems (bones, muscles, liga­ments and connecting joints). Based on the principles of mechanics, human limbs equilibrium is studied.

  • Dynamic modelling - motion study of anatomical segments under the action of a force system. The fundamental characteristics and general theorems are presented and applied in order to study the human locomotion, improve the balance and prevent falls and fractures.

  • Numerical analysis - basics of FEM theory and general ANSYS specific capabilities. Using Finite Element Analysis biomechanical behaviour of human body parts can be predicted.

  • Implants, prostheses, and ortheses – implant design, biomaterials, customized implant manufacturing. Several implants for long bones are presented. Stages of customized implant manufacturing, starting from image acquisition based on CT scanning to implant finishing and coating are presented and exemplified for a total hip/knee prosthesis.

  • Applications - numerical analysis of an osteoporotic femur implanted with a customized hip/knee prosthesis.

The course consists of theoretical sessions followed by computer simulations focused on prediction of the biomechanical behaviour of customized implanted bone systems in case of elderly people.

Medical Image Processing

Dr. Szabolcs Sergyán, Associate Professor

Topics of the course are image processing fundamentals and object recognition: 

  • Image representation
  • Spatial filtering
  • Greyscale and colour images
  • Morphological image processing
  • Image segmentation
  • Colour object recognition

The course has theoretical as well as practical parts.

Biomaterial Science: 
Fundamentals & Nanotechnological Applications

Ass.Prof. Dilek ÇökeliLer

During the last century, interest in biomaterials has grown from mere curiosity to routine clinical use, saving lives and improving the quality of life for millions of people. Today, biomaterials and medical devices are a $100 billion industry. This course will cover many fundamental areas such as: 

  • An overview of the biomaterials field (definitions, etc.),
  • The current status of the biomaterials field, 
  • The properties of biomaterials that make them useful in medical (and clinical) applications, 
  • Introduction to the major classes of biomedical materials: ceramics, metals, and polymers. Their structure, properties, and fabrication connected to biological applications, from implants to tissue engineered devices. 
  • New trends and future prospects. 

Course Outline:
Material science and relation between medicine. Properties of polymeric, metallic and ceramic biomaterials. Natural biological materials. Artificial biologic materials. Applications of material sciences in biomedical engineering. Mechanics, corrosive and surface properties, tissue reactions of biomaterials. Medical applications of researches in material sciences. Synthesis of nanomaterials, nanoparticles and biomedical applications. Nanostructured coatings. 

DATECOURSE SYLLABUS
26.08.   Introduction to the Material Science & Engineering Biomaterial Science
Bulk properties - chemical bonds - surface energy 
Classifications & advanced biomaterials
27.08.Polymeric, metallic & ceramic biomaterials
28.08.Composite biomaterials performance of biomaterials; Mechanical and biological tests
29.08.Introduction to the nanotechnology 
Fundamentals of synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials 
Nanostructured coatings; Plasma polymerisation technique nanosensors; NEMS and MEMS 
Carbon nanotubes

Designing Ambient Assisted Living Applications

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Frank Wallhoff

According to the definition of the EC, Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) is an applied research topic with the aim of enhancing the quality of life of older people and strengthening the industrial base in Europe through the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Therefore, driven by the demographic change in Europe, AAL is an activity that operates in the field of services and actions to enable the active ageing among the population.

Besides a strong relation to user inclusion and business models, AAL strongly bases on Assisted Technologies that itself combine novel user interfaces and a broad range of diverse applications such as service robotics, healthcare or smart homes. Typical AAL themes cover ICT based solutions for:

  • Prevention and management of chronic conditions of elderly people
  • Advancement of social interaction of elderly people
  • Advancement of older persons’ independence and participation in the "self-serve society"
  • Advancement of older persons’ mobility
  • (Self-) Management of daily life activities of older adults at home
  • Supporting occupation in life of older adults

In this course the focus will lie on the modelling of human-machine interaction. Besides gaining insight to a multi-modal representation, a small robotic solution shall be implemented during the course.  

Subjects of the course:

  • Overview of typical AAL applications
  • Modelling of human-computer interaction
  • Basics of pattern recognition technologies
  • First steps into feature extraction technologies
  • Dialog modelling using speech recognition and text-to-speech
  • Fundamental knowledge in programming embedded systems

Learning outcomes:

  • Basics of human-computer interaction
  • Basics of pattern recognition technologies for speech recognition
  • Basics of pattern recognition technologies for computer vision based systems
  • Awareness of the limitations of state-of-the-art modelling of intelligent systems
  • Implement smaller dialogs using a given tool chain
  • Demonstration via a small robotic qFix platform

Biosignal Processing

Drs. Jan Zijlstra

The term biosignals covers all observables that can be measured and monitored from biological origin in whatever form. The term biosignal is often used to mean bio-electrical signal but in fact, biosignal refers to both electrical and non-electrical measurable variables. Currently the interest in biosignals and their processing is increased promoted by the availability of relatively cheap hardware and sensors as well as increasing computer processing power, creating a lot of biosignal information.

In this course the focus is on biosignals from the human body. These signals tend to weak, noisy and contain artifacts. Processing is required to retrieve the relevant information for the physician and to reduce the amount of raw data.

Subjects of the course:

  • Origin of biosignals
  • Measurement of biosignals and its limitations
  • Sampling, digitization, aliasing, artifacts, noise
  • Digital filtering using Z-transform
  • Using Fourier transform to obtain the frequency (spectral) content of biosignals
  • The analogon of signal and food processing
  • Measuring and processing of biosignals using Labview

Learning Outcomes:

  • Student knows the basics of biosignals
  • Student is aware of the limitations measuring of processing
  • Student can explain and apply different filtering techniques in signal processing
  • Student is able to demonstrate and report his knowledge in practical assignment about biosignal processing

Applied Biomechanics

Prof. Dr. Andreas Schrempf

In this four day course we will focus on the application of biomechanical principles to solve several real world problems, which include

  • computing muscle and joint forces for given body movements,
  • detecting and classifying physical activity by means of acceleration sensors, and
  • the analysis of the fall of elderly people.

At the first course day we will work out the main principles for analyzing body movements with respect to motion and forces. Since biomechanical problems lead in most cases to undetermined problems, the second course day is dedicated to solving problems numerically by means of the open source software OpenSim. Based on the methods worked out, at the remaining days of the course we are going to measure and analyze different body movements in the lab.

Cognitive Ergonomics / User Centred Design

Richard Vos, M.Sc., Gerda Jonker, MMS

During this course we will go into the user’s side of development, we will explore who and what the engineers are working for. 

Now, we realize that anything can be made by now, and if not technologically doable today, it will be tomorrow. This makes that the ‘consumer’ industry in refocusing from technology driven design towards user-centred design. Yes, sustainability is also a buzzword these days, but think about it, does sustainable only mean degradable or reusable? No, of course not! If things need to be sustainable it means also that these products are used well and to the satisfaction of the customer / user.

The two days programme course Cognitive Ergonomics / User Centred Design (UCD) will focus on product development from an interaction design perspective in which insights from psychology and the domain of user interfaces will be applied. You will work in a project team towards a solution to a real world problem. A theoretic framework will be offered and several user-centred methods and techniques from the field of interaction design will be applied. In the end each team will present their solution.

The course will contain these topics: 

  • Beyond usability; what the user really wants, but has not even thought of yet – lecture and workshops in which you will be introduced to the field of Human Technology interaction. You will have to try thinking the thoughts of your targeted user, understand the context of use, the human-product interaction, requirement specification, and more.
     
  • Lectures will focus on cognitive ergonomics, user interfaces, principles of design, and, yes… bloopers. 

In addition, the second day we will start with cultural background presentations (for this part each nationality has to prepare a really smashing presentation). Afterwards we’ll be discussing intercultural differences and how we - and international product development - relate to these differences.